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Aladin Nesterov
Aladin Nesterov

How To Buy Green Bay Packers Stock ^NEW^


"We were very pleased with the enthusiastic response from our fans during the recent stock offering," said Packers President/CEO Mark Murphy. "We are proud to welcome a new generation of shareholders from across the country and Canada. Their support is a critical component of our ability to continue enhancing the fan experience and investing in Lambeau Field. Maintaining our stadium as a top-tier facility that serves as a year-round destination contributes to the sustained success of both the franchise and our community."




how to buy green bay packers stock



If you are a current shareholder and have questions regarding your past stock purchase, need to update your account information, or have any other questions, please call shareholder services at 855-8GO-PACK or 855-846-7225. Or, email at shareholderservices@packers.com. Information is also online at packersowner.com.


The Green Bay Packers work with Broadridge Corporate Issuer Solutions, Inc. ("Broadridge") to provide recordkeeping services for the shares of our stock. Together with Broadridge we manage all stock certificate requests for shareholders, including changes of address, replacement of lost and stolen certificates, and transfer of shares. More information about your ownership can be found online at packersowner.com.


Please note that Green Bay Packers common stock is not available for purchase outside of an offering period. The Packers' last stock sale was offered through February 29, 2012. Future offerings are not currently being considered.


The Packers' first five stock sales in their history took place in 1923, 1935, 1950, 1997 and 2011. The 2011 sale, with shares priced at $250, added more than 250,000 new shareholders and raised $67.4 million toward a new entrance tower and viewing platform in the north end zone and an expansion that added roughly 6,600 seats to the south end zone. That project was completed in 2013. The 1997 sale, with shares priced at $200, added 105,989 new shareholders and raised more than $24 million, which was used for the Lambeau Field redevelopment project completed in 2003.


Find exclusive Shareholder merchandise created just for Shareholders at the Packers Pro Shop website. Go to packersproshop.com and click on the shareholder tab to sign on using your stock account information. There you will find a vast assortment of specialized items created just for Packers shareholders!


The Green Bay Packers, with its unique public ownership structure, today launched the organization's sixth stock offering, with shares priced at $300. Money raised from the offering will go toward ongoing construction projects at Lambeau Field, including new video boards and concourse upgrades.


"We're excited to offer shares for just the sixth time in our franchise's history," said Packers President/CEO Mark Murphy. "Since we received permission from the NFL last month for a stock offering, fans have been excited. Their support is a key component of our ability to invest in Lambeau Field and maintain it as a top-tier sporting experience, which in turn contributes to the continued success of the franchise.


The Packers' sixth stock sale, which ended Feb. 25, raised $65.8 million through the sale of about 198,000 shares at $300 each plus a $35 handling fee. The Packers picked up 176,160 shareholders, bringing total ownership to more than 537,000.


The team said the proceeds would be used for construction projects at Lambeau Field, including new video boards and concourse upgrades. The NFL requires money raised by a stock sale to be used only for stadium projects that are beneficial to fans.


Previous stock sales were in 1923, 1935, 1950, 1997 and 2011. The first three sales bailed the team out of dire financial straits. The 1997 sale helped pay for the 2003 renovation of Lambeau Field and the 2011 sale contributed to more renovations, as will this sale.


The Green Bay Packers stock offering launched on Tuesday, Nov. 16. The money raised from the offering will go toward ongoing construction projects at Lambeau Field, including new video boards and concourse upgrades.


The Packers are the only publicly owned major professional sports franchise in the United States.[1] Rather than being the property of an individual, partnership, or corporate entity, they are held as of 2022 by 537,460 stockholders.[2] No one is allowed to hold more than 200,000 shares,[3] which represents approximately four percent of the 5,011,558 shares currently outstanding.[4] It is this broad-based community support and non-profit structure[5] which has kept the team in Green Bay for over a century in spite of being the smallest market in all of North American major professional sports.[a]


The Packers have been a publicly owned, non-profit corporation since August 18, 1923. The corporation currently has approximately 537,460 stockholders, who collectively own approximately 5,200,000 shares of stock following the sixth stock sale in 2021.[7] There have been six stock sales, in 1923, 1935, 1950, 1997, 2011, and 2021.[3] Shares in 1923 sold for $5 apiece (approximately $75 in 2020 dollars), while in 1997 they were sold at $200 each, $250 each in 2011, and $300 each in 2021.[4][5]


Even though it is referred to as "common stock" in corporate offering documents, a share of Packers stock does not share the same rights traditionally associated with common or preferred stock. It does not include an equity interest, does not pay dividends, cannot be traded, and has no protection under securities law. It also confers no season-ticket purchasing privileges. Shareholders receive nothing more than voting rights, an invitation to the corporation's annual meeting, and an opportunity to purchase exclusive shareholder-only merchandise.[5]


At the team's 1997 annual stockholders meeting, the foundation was designated, in place of a Sullivan-Wallen Post soldiers memorial, as recipient of any residual assets upon the team's sale or dissolution.[4]


The NFL requires money raised by a stock sale to be used only for stadium projects that are beneficial to fans. The money cannot be used for operating expenses or to expand player facilities. The Packers are the only team to which the rule applies because they are the only publicly owned team.


Packers stock cannot be sold and it does not pay dividends. It can be transferred to family members. Shareholders get to vote for Packers board directors and certain other motions at the annual shareholders meeting in July.


However, that's about where the similarities end. Unlike a normal piece of stock such as Tesla or Apple, you cannot sell your Packers shares, they don't increase or decrease in value, and they don't afford you any voting power. So basically, you're just buying a symbolic piece of ownership of the four-time Super Bowl champions.


However, if you believe that you're buying a piece of stock with intrinsic value that could increase over time, then you'd better take a step back -- this isn't that. In the team's own words via a press conference yesterday:


The Green Bay Packers on Tuesday will offer to sell $90 million of "stock" in the NFL team to help fund improvements at Lambeau Field, just the sixth time in the squad's storied history that it has offered shares to the public.


Green Bay Packers stock is still selling like hotcakes. More than 250,000 shares have been sold since the first share offering in 15 years was announced on Dec. 6. Demand has been so great that the team expanded the offering, which runs through Feb. 29, by 30,000 shares.


Although the offering document calls the shares "common stock," they confer almost none of the advantages of a traditional stock. The document warns that buyers "should not purchase common stock with the purpose of making a profit."


Other investment advisers let heart rule head when it comes to the Packers. David Dickmeyer, a wealth adviser who lives in Fort Wayne, Ind., but grew up near Green Bay, cheerfully admits "there's no financial benefit" to owning the stock. Nevertheless he bought five shares, one for each member of his family. "We're now proud owners," he says.


The stock offering also has corporate governance experts at odds. "What's the point of being a shareholder if you can't act like one? If the directors took the money and went to Aruba, shareholders couldn't sue," says Joshua Fershee, a Detroit Lions fan and a professor at the University of North Dakota's law school.


UCLA law professor Stephen Bainbridge, who switched allegiance to the Packers from the Washington Redskins and now owns a share of stock, disagrees. "These shareholders don't have any rights," he says, and "this is a great example of letting management do its thing without investors kibitzing from the sidelines."


The Packers stock is but one element of its unique organization. Founded in 1919 but with roots going back to the origins of American football, the team operates as a publicly held nonprofit company. NFL rules don't allow other franchises to use the Green Bay model, and Green Bay is the smallest city hosting a major team (2010 population: 104,057).


So meager are the monetary benefits of owning Packers' stock that Willens, the tax expert, thinks a purchase might be tax-deductible right after shares are bought. "They meet the conditions of worthless stock, in that it has no pecuniary value for the owner," he says. "Better a small tax benefit than none at all."


Ed Kleinbard, a former top tax staffer in Congress who's now a professor at USC's law school, is an Oakland Raiders fan but he disagrees about the tax deduction. "The stock isn't worthless as long as someone will buy it, although I wouldn't," he says. "Maybe it's a collectible."


The Packers are currently having a stock sale, with around 174,000 shares still available for purchase until February 25, 2022. Shares can now be purchased by anyone in all 50 U.S. states and Washington D.C., as well as Guam, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Canada.


A single share costs $300 in both the United States and Canada, not including handling fees. The Packers have held five stock sales, with the most recent one in 2011. Proceeds from the ongoing sale will go towards construction projects around Lambeau Field. 041b061a72


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